Scheduled Programs and Learning Institutes

Program List

All programs are 1.5 hours unless otherwise noted. Conference programs will take place on Thursday, Nov. 10 and Friday, Nov. 11. Learning Institutes are available to in-person attendees on Wednesday, Nov. 9 (earn 6.5 CE hours for $130). 

In-Person vs. Virtual Programs

The suite of pre-selected programs below are available to in-person attendees but will also be live-streamed for the virtual audience. They will be available to watch online until December 31. All other programs are in-person attendance only (e.g., Poster Session and Learning Institutes).

Conference Program 

Conference programs are listed by Programs, Poster Session, and Learning Institute.*This list is subject to change.

(P) - Programs | (PS) - Poster Session | (LI) Learning Institute


WEDNESDAY LEARNING INSTITUTES

Wednesday - Nov. 9

9:30am - 5:00 pm

A. TACES Presents: Student and Supervisee Remediation (LI)
Time: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Room: Seminar
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision & Management
Presenter(s): Paul Carrola; Kate Walker; Megan Pickens

Remediation is one of the most challenging processes that counselor educators and supervisors engage in. It is required through national standards for counselor education programs through the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) standards (2016; 2022) and supervisors in Texas are required to implement remediation plans when supervisees do not demonstrate expected counseling skills or competence (681.93.e). Also, the American Counseling Association (2014) requires remedial assistance in both training programs and during professional credentialing processes and actions such as dismissal when supervisees are unable demonstrate that they can provide competent counseling services. Because remediation is a required role during both training and licensure processes, it is important that counselor educators and supervisors are aware of practices during the entire training and development of supervisees. This session will focus on remediation practices both in counselor education programs and during post graduate supervision for licensure. These practices will include the specifics of documentation and due process as well as growth enhancing strategies for both student interns and LPC Associates.

B. TAADA Presents: Individual & Community Grieving Across the Lifespan - Help for the Holidays (LI)
Time: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Room: Houston A
Topic: Grief Counseling
Presenter(s): Patricia Johnson

Loss, and the grief it creates, often becomes more intense during seasons of cultural celebration. To meet the growing needs for a path through this darkness, TAADA offers a Learning Institute which will inform and equip counselors while additionally addressing the growing weight counselors carry from personal and vicarious grief. The design of this TAADA Learning Institute takes participants through developmental factors which influence grief experienced across the lifespan, and the evolving models developed to meet the challenges various age groups experience. Individual, family, and group challenges will be explored. Additionally, this TAADA Learning Institute will address seldom recognized topics such as invisible loss, complicated grief, accidental killers, and grief anxiety. Respect and compassion will carry participants through the interconnection's families, schools, organizations, and communities experience with multiple losses (pandemic, climate catastrophes, community violence). Participants will be invited to address the weight of these losses, along with traditional losses (health, accidents) through a wide variety of experiential activities. Case studies will provide practice with selecting approaches. Additionally, the TAADA Learning Institute will provide practical self-care steps for counselors who strive to assist clients and participate in holiday events, while carrying personal grief. Handouts will include literature references and online resources.

C. TAARC Presents: Making Your Way in APA Writing Style and Format (LI)
Time: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Room: Houston B
Topic: Professional Issues
Presenter(s): Stephen Lenz; Rochelle Cade

Effective writing is critical to the success of students and counselor educators; yet, opportunities for protracted support to become a strong writer area are often outpaced by demands for us to already be one. This learning institute will provide an in-depth opportunity to learn and apply the American Psychological Association (APA) publication guidelines in student papers and scientific reports. Rather than just talk about APA format and writing style, we are going to apply session content and put you in the driver's seat for developing your knowledge and skills. Specifically, we will learn and apply best practices to (1) format documents, (2) develop title pages, (3) implement multi-level headings, (4) use in-text citations, (5) reference sources, (6) create tables, (7) organize arguments, (8) express ideas in active voice, (9) reduce bias associated with age, gender and ethnicity identities, and ability status, (10) communicate with precision and clarity, and (11) implement mechanics of style across numerals, punctuation, and direct quotations. This is an active institute emphasizing practical skills so bring your computer or a notepad; a manuscript of your own or use one of our examples- anyway you choose, you are sure to leave with new skills for using APA7.

D. TMHCA Presents: The Private Practice Road Map: Getting Started & Maintaining A Counseling Practice in Texas (LI)
Time: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Room: Houston C
Topic: Private Practice
Presenter(s): Olivia Wedel; Lori Hollingsworth; Barry Blackman; Marty Jeane

TMHCA Board Members have combined decades of experience for this presentation in response to numerous requests for training on getting started in private practice. The presentation is designed for individuals brand new to the field, such as LPC Associates, but will also be an informative for any licensed professional wanting to pursue private practice. The presentation will detail business basics from filing for the NPI to selecting malpractice insurance and maintaining HIPAA compliance. The presentation will be based on the Texas LPC Rules and related state codes that inform best practices and ethical guidelines. In addition to business basics, we will discuss ethics around helping the helper and minimizing isolation, and offer suggestions for how to reach those in underserved and underrepresented communities in our state.

E. Follow Your Yellow Brick Road: Enhanced School Counseling Programs through Performance Improvement (LI)
Time: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Elias Zambrano; Ernest Cox

2021 Texas legal standards require 'a school counselor to spend 'at least 80% of the school counselor's total work time on duties that are components of a counseling program developed under Section 33.005.' School counselors have professional responsibilities in providing competent and quality services. The Texas Model for Comprehensive School Counseling Programs and the TEMPSC III will be used to assist participants in using program and performance standards to enhance and enrich the delivery of client services and meet the requirement of law.

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THURSDAY CONFERENCE PROGRAMS AND POSTER SESSIONS

Thursday - Nov. 10


8:00 - 9:30 am

1. TSCA Presents: 'Advocacy through Counselor Connections' (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Seminar
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Ernest Cox; Heather Degroot

Program Summary: This session is designed to facilitate conversations amongst participants whereby they will engage with each other and discuss opportunities on how to advocate and lead their comprehensive school counseling program. The TSCA board presenters will structure conversations around the comprehensive school counseling program and school counselors' ethical and professional standards within school and community. The session will also include discussions around utilizing the Texas Model for Comprehensive School Counseling Program and the Texas Evaluation Model (TEMPSC) to advocate for the school counseling program, services for all students, and the appropriate school counselor roles and responsibilities (adhering to SB 179). Participants will utilize the Beginning and Middle of the Year School Counseling Plan to guide their next steps for counseling program improvement..

2. Remediation Can be Empowering: Demystifying the Remediation Process in Supervisions (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A1
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Jinnelle Powell

The primary purpose of the supervisory relationship is to guide counselors in training toward becoming effective, competent, ethical, and independent professional counselors. In Texas, associate-level counselors are now able to launch a private practice under the supervision of a Board Approved Supervisor. In this session, participants will have an opportunity to calm remediation fears while ensuring they remain attentive to the gatekeeping, an integral part of the role of a supervisor. During this presentation, attendees will be introduced to Relational Cultural Theory (RCT) concepts specifically learning how to create mutual growth-fostering relationships, engage in power-with as opposed to power-over, and foster space for authenticity and vulnerability in the supervisory relationship. Participants will have the opportunity to conceptualize the remediation process within an RCT framework. Participants in this presentation will also explore the remediation process while gaining insights regarding the relationship between remediation and gatekeeping, the value of informed consent in supervision, inherent power dynamics, professional dispositions, and counselor impairment. Session attendees will be provided with the presenter's informed consent and remediation plan documents both designed within an RCT framework. Participants will leave empowered with the tools and skills to successfully remediate current and future supervisees.

3. When All Means All - Supporting All Students No Matter Their Disability (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A2
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Audrey Abell

How can a professional school counselor implement the 4 components of the comprehensive school counseling program that includes meeting the needs of those with disabilities? Not even sure where to start? From this session, participants will walk away with applicable tips and tricks to apply when counseling students on the autism spectrum and those with intellectual disabilities. Easy-to-implement ideas will be shared; along with strategies to use that take into consideration the different ways in which students learn and process information. Important considerations and practical resources will also be shared to form small counseling groups, determine group topics, and counseling session tips and tricks to use when working with students with disabilities.

4. Suicide Risk Assessment, Prevention, & Intervention (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A3
Topic: Suicide Prevention, Intervention, Postvention
Presenter(s): Audrey Zatopek

Suicide completion rates are on the rise in the United States (American Association of Suicidology, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020) and, unfortunately, there exists a lack of ability as well as lack of confidence in practitioners' abilities to assess for suicidality (Fruhbauerova & Comtois, 2019; Schmidt, 2016). The goal of this presentation is to equip practicing mental health professionals with global best-practice knowledge and skills for suicide prevention. It is also hoped that the information in this presentation will help clinicians more confidently and successfully help suicidal clientele.

5. Cultivating Community for Black Families within the Educational System (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A4
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Danielle Hall; Cynthia Jones; Rachel Portlock

Since the reconstruction period, Black families have had the role of empowerment to educate, cultivate and liberate the children in the communities that they served. There was a sense of pride and responsibility for the educational process from the administrators to the teachers which also included their parents and their children (Brown & Beckett, 2007). Our modern-day educational process is not as consistent. The Texas Education Agency reports that 12.6% of students enrolled in public schools are Black. Other statistics for Black students enrolled in Texas public schools include, that 12.6% are considered At Risk, 15.1% identified for Special Education services, and 6.4% are included in the Gifted and Talented programs (TEA, 2020). The disparities and inequalities of the educational system are enough for any parent to be alarmed. Pew Research has found that over half of Black Americans believe positive mentorship helps them to be successful in future STEM careers (2022). As community leaders, we have the potential to change the educational system and encourage growth and trust throughout the Black community. The purpose of this presentation is to cultivate multicultural growth as it pertains to Black families and build trust.

6. Time to Advocate for Counseling Compact Legislation in Texas (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Houston A
Topic: Professional Issues
Presenter(s): Kathy Ybanez-Llorente

With 22 states already enacting or pending legislation to become a member of the Counseling Compact, the reality of national counselor portability is closer than ever. In order for Texas counselors to participate, Texas must enact legislation to become a member state of the Counseling Compact. Now is the time to prepare counselors and supportive constituents to advocate for portability and encourage decisive action by our elected legislators. In 2019, an advisory group funded by the American Counseling Association collaborated with the National Center for Interstate Compacts to create an occupational licensure compact for professional counselors. This presentation will be presented by a member of the advisory group and will examine the development of the interstate counseling compact that has already been enacted by 14 states (at the time of this proposal). Participants will discuss how to support state legislative efforts to bring portability relief to licensed professional counselors in Texas, and the nation.

7. Unlike Bruno, We Gotta Talk About Sex! A Clinician's Ethical Obligations (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Houston B
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Traci Test; Sarah Stillwell; Bryce Connor

Join us as we discuss the responsibility and awareness of broaching sex in session for both the clinician and counselor educator. We will discuss counseling methods and interventions to help initiate relevant conversations about sex with clients and supervision. We will compare perspectives on a developmental growth level of sexual development and personal exploration. It is now more important than ever for counselors and counselor educators to distinguish the barriers in social justice while supporting a healthy sexuality development in their clients. Come explore where the research literature, ACA Ethical Codes, Texas Administrative Code and recent trends meet that include the responsibility of the counselor in broaching the subject of sexuality with clients in session. Includes helpful hints for overcoming obstacles, tips and implications for counselors advocating for clients in the current culture.

8. Reconsidering Acculturation: Fostering Cultural Integration to Promote Client Authenticity (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: Houston C
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Joy Teles Oliveira; Sarah Silveus

As the United States becomes increasingly diversified, it is more crucial than ever that counselors understand how to effectively work with clients from different national and cultural backgrounds. Historically, counseling with immigrant clients has emphasized helping clients through the acculturation process by promoting assimilation to American culture. In this session, we will explore how traditional approaches to assimilation may not be congruent with immigrant populations and can result in increased psychological distress. Instead, we will introduce strategies that promote cultural reflection and cultural integration and examine how emphasizing clients' own cultural perspectives can result in greater authenticity and stronger treatment outcomes for immigrant clients

9. Cultivating an Inclusive Attitude for Counselors-in-Training: Shaping Our Future Therapists! (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Sneha Nayar-Bhalerao; Monique Rahman

Being inclusive is to accept and respect everyone, regardless of their differences. When a person feels included, they are better able to contribute to their group without the fear of being ostracized. Mental health professionals play a crucial role as they work with diverse people with complex emotional issues. Creating a therapeutic space that is biasfree, accepting and non-judgmental, enables a person to express themselves fully and be their authentic self. Having an inclusive attitude can be modeled and cultivated through interactions in counseling practice, supervision, and education. In this conversational presentation audiences will understand the term inclusivity, its importance, and the many barriers to it. Specific evidence-based techniques will be provided that can be implemented to create an inclusive attitude for counselor-in-training through supervision and education. Handouts will be provided.

10. Sexual Violence: A Trauma-Informed Somatic Approach to Healing (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: San Antonio B
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Presenter(s): Nevine Sultan

Memories of sexual violence can be intrusive, impacting the nervous system and perceptual, sensory-kinesthetic, emotional, social-relational, and cognitive functioning, and promoting disconnection from the body. Trauma-informed somatic counseling approaches to sexual violence offer clinicians treatment options that mitigate re-traumatization by helping clients recognize when their nervous systems go into fight / flight / freeze / appease mode due to perceived threat. Counselors can help clients access, in the present moment, the somatic memory of sexual injury rather than engage the potentially retraumatizing story, working with the wisdom of the body to support autonomy and promote empowerment and agency. In this workshop, we will explore the trauma response to sexual violence and a variety of trauma-informed somatic interventions, founded on a warm therapeutic alliance, to support integration and wholeness

11. Couple's Therapy for the Adult ADHD challenged couple (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: State Room 1
Topic: Couple & Family Counseling
Presenter(s): Deborah Ferguson-Cain

Approximately 15 million adults have ADHD, and they and their partners often experience significant relationship difficulties as a result. Counselors will learn how to recognize and specifically treat couples affected by adult ADHD. The three critical elements for treating ADHD challenged couples will be discussed. Clinical interventions for communication, money management, sharing household responsibilities, parenting, problem solving and sexual intimacy will be addressed. Case studies will also be utilized to enhance clinical application.

12. Rural West Texas Mental Health Educational Learning Partnership (HELP) (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: State Room 2
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Lesley Casarez

Education Service Center Region 15, Angelo State University, and area school districts have collaborated over the past few years and continue to do so for a U.S. Department of Education grant titled 'Rural West Texas Mental Health Educational Learning Partnership (HELP).' The purpose of this grant is to utilize a 'grow your own' model to train professional school counselors in order to reduce the student-to-counselor ratios in area school districts. The first two cohorts have successfully completed and two more are in process. This presentation will discuss the process undertaken and share how a similar process could be implemented.

13. Salient Issues in Navigating Successful Intercultural Adoptions (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: State Room 3
Topic: Child & Adolescent Counseling
Presenter(s): Brandy Mounts; Loretta Bradley; Riley Donato; Daniela Hernandrez

Although parenting is often a challenging role, it is especially challenging when adopting from a different race and/or cultural background. While it is difficult for children to be separated from their birth families, the difficulty can be magnified because many of these children have experienced past trauma, neglect, and abuse, as well as having to navigate transracial or transcultural issues in their adoptive families. Although the above experiences sometimes seem insurmountable, this presentation will focus on helping participants learn ways to navigate these issues. Understanding the intricacies of transracial and transcultural adoption issues and developing multicultural counseling competencies will be stressed.

14. Doctor Doctor, Give Me the News: Recognizing Medical Needs in Session and How to Intervene (P)
Time: 8:00-9:30am
Room: State Room 4
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Amanda St Germain-Sehr; Alissa Carver

Counselors are able to provide a robust variety of supportive and integrative services to their clients. However, many clients have acute and chronic medical needs that need the attention of a physician, and either present primarily with changes in mental status that masks underlying issues, or are disregarded by medical staff because of their psychiatric history. By receiving information about common medical issues that require immediate attention and learning simple, effective interventions while waiting for medical response, a therapist can lessen the impact of medical emergencies and potentially save lives.

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THURSDAY POSTER SESSIONS

Thursday - Nov. 10


12:00 - 1:00 pm

Professional Counseling and Speech-Language Pathology: A Unique Interprofessional Collaboration (PS)

Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Day: Thursday
Presenter(s): Kathy Ybanez-Llorente; Maria Resendiz

Many counseling settings include interdisciplinary treatment teams, but a focus on developing the skills necessary to work within these teams is not always highlighted in counselor education. Graduate students preparing for off campus internships working in medically under served counties were administered a survey to identify their perceptions of interprofessional delivery of services by two professions: Professional Counseling and Communication Disorders. Questions about knowledge of and comfort working with patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds were also asked. This poster presentation provides an analysis of these perceptions and suggestions for guiding graduate students through developing the requisite skills to successfully work within interdisciplinary settings.

Older Asian Indian Americans: Mental Health Considerations for Distinguished Desis (PS)
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Day: Thursday
Presenter(s): Dhruvi Patel; John Harrichand

The Asian Indian American community is one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the nation. At a population verging over four million, Indian Americans are the second-largest immigrant group after Mexican Americans and the largest source of new immigrants to America. Accordingly, the number of older Indian immigrants is steadily growing, with 20% of Indian Americans over the age of 50 in a 2017-2019 appraisal. Yet, amid Indian Americans' underrepresentation in the counseling literature, its segment of older adults has garnered even less attention despite unique characteristics and needs, significantly neglecting their mental health and mental health utilization. With 87% of Indian Americans born outside the U.S., older Indian Americans face experiences that include inevitable losses and transitions associated with mortality and aging, as well as distinctive challenges born of contexts of immigration and transnational acculturation. Alongside nuances endemic to Indian American experience (e.g., intercultural conflict and integration, intergenerational clashes), both individual histories of immigration and idiosyncratic aging processes exert implications for mental health. This poster session describes common characteristics and needs of the older Indian American community and advances culturally responsive frameworks to utilize with this growing population, in Meaning-Centered Counseling and Therapy (MCCT) and the RESPECTFUL model.

Two Paths Diverged: Using a 'Choose your own Adventure' Activity to Increase Student Self-Efficacy (PS)
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Day: Thursday
Presenter(s): Ross Spears; Madelyn Duffey

This poster will focus on a novel, creative teaching activity for a counseling skills class. Research indicates that creative counselor education can increase clinical competence and creativity (McGhee et al., 2019). The presenters will discuss how a 'Choose your own Adventure' activity was used in counseling classes to increase student self-efficacy.

The Impact of Counselor Practices and Background Characteristics on Disciplinary Outcomes (PS)
Topic: School Counseling
Day: Thursday
Presenter(s): Tiffany Chaney

The purpose of this research will be to present the Doctoral Candidate's Abstract Proposal in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education in Counseling at Texas Southern University. The program proposes to investigate the impact of counseling practices, counselor demographics and counseling experience impacts middle school on discipline outcomes. The purpose of the quantitative research study will be to examine the influence of counseling practices, specifically, social-emotional learning, individual planning/conference and group counseling on discipline outcomes of middle school student behavior. The researcher will utilize secondary data from middle school students and counselors. The secondary data for counselors was collected using a general survey by the independent school district. The secondary data for students will be collected using a pre and post survey provided by 7 Mindsets and discipline data collected by the school district.

Let's Meet Before Valhalla: Positive Effects of Using Outdoor Interventions on Veteran Mental Health (PS)
Topic: Suicide Prevention, Intervention, Postvention
Day: Thursday
Presenter(s): Julia LeClair; K. Michelle Hunnicutt Hollenbaugh

The National Veteran Suicide Prevention Annual Report (VA, 2021) revealed United States veterans had over 50% higher suicide rates than those who are not veterans. Since 2005, over 6000 veterans die by suicide annually. In the last decade, there has been a big push for service members and veterans to seek mental health services to address some of the current challenges they face. Many veterans feel and think they are alone and do not experience the same bond and sense of belonging after separating from the military. This poster will report the benefits of implementing outdoor therapeutic settings and interventions to improve veteran mental health. With veterans having their own cultures and subcultures, the benefits of outdoor therapeutic interventions are to give veterans the 'safe' space they need to feel more open and comfortable in addressing their mental health challenges. There will be an emphasis on the importance and combination of military veterans reconnecting with other veterans and the therapeutic effectiveness of outdoor activities on mental health. Recommendations will be provided for practicing counselors seeking to improve veteran mental health and combat the veteran death by suicide rate. Handouts with veteran resources will be provided.

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THURSDAY PROGRAMS

Thursday - Nov. 10


12:00 - 1:30 pm

15. A Cultural Competency Framework to Counseling with Immigrants (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A1
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Patricia Arredondo

Dr. Arredondo will expand upon themes discussed in her keynote presentation.

16. Expanding Your Counseling Practice with Counseling Student Interns (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A2
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Kara Hurt; Diane Smedley

Counseling training is built upon clinical experience; a majority of which is offered through counseling internships in the community. Specifically geared towards practitioners, this session will provide participants with the knowledge and resources to effectively integrate counseling student interns into their practice. Internship site supervisors provide counseling interns with invaluable professional development experiences that significantly shape their future as practitioners. However, the process of successfully integrating counseling interns into a counseling practice requires intentionality and planning. By beginning with dialogue and transparency, the presenters will share their insights as both practitioners and counselor educators to guide participants in their pursuit of expanding their practices and better meeting the mental health needs of their communities. In acknowledgment of the gap between academia and clinical practice, this session aims to empower practitioners and honor their vital contributions to the development of future generations of counselors. This session will attend to the topics of policies and procedures, effective onboarding, communication with faculty instructors, supervision best practices, curricular standards, professional development of counseling student interns, and troubleshooting issues. Participants are encouraged to bring their questions, comments, and concerns to this highly interactive presentation.

17. Supporting Diverse Clients with Eating Disorders (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A3
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Emily Horton; Crystal Hughes

Eating disorders occur in all ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, abilities, and ages, yet significant areas of growth exist within the counseling field in providing care to clients of diverse populations with eating disorders. This presentation includes discussion of how to support diverse clients, including BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, men, older clients, differently-abled clients, and clients of normal BMI, with eating disorders and disordered eating. Come to this experiential presentation to have the opportunity to engage in self-reflection on your perceptions of food, body, and movement, and how that impacts how you show up when supporting diverse clients with eating disorders.

18. Learning to Heal: Activities that support youth resiliency from death, dying, and loss (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A4
Topic: Grief Counseling
Presenter(s): Erin Kaszynski; Shirin Khosravi

In recent years, youth in the United States have faced ever-present death, grief, and loss. Youth struggle to cope and understand how to move forward, whether it's the death of a loved one, dying friends and family, or fear of future loss. However, it is not just the possible death of a loved one; youth have had to face the loss of favorite activities, school and life experiences, and futures they had envisioned. In this session, we will review common responses of grieving youth, essential skills and considerations for school and mental health counselors, and activities and interventions they can use to support their resiliency and recovery.

19. Beyond the Therapy Room: Embracing Your Unique Counselor Identity and Building a Brand (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: Houston A
Topic: Private Practice
Presenter(s): Cyndi Doyle; Kate Walker

Counseling isn't always what you thought it would be. You're attracting clients but sometimes feel uninspired and burned out. You see certifications, courses, and business-building pitches and feel the pull to sign up. Increased demands for mental health services created due to COVID-19 and social shifts have you assessing the risk of income and impact versus your own mental health, burnout, and compassion fatigue. What you need is a clear counselor identity, brand, and growth plan! Dig into your counselor identity with 2 LPCs who have leaned into authenticity and built successful brand identities and revenue streams outside the therapy room including courses, podcasts, books, speaking, and other products. Attack toxic mindsets of comparison, scarcity, and imposter syndrome. Gain tools to uncover your unique counselor identity. Ethically build messaging and branding to attract clients you were uniquely made to serve. Learn how to strategically plan products and services to positively impact communities and increase income and resilience.

20. TAADA Presents: Thanks Again: How Practicing Gratitude Impacts Outcomes Across the Lifespan (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: Houston B
Topic: Wellness
Presenter(s): Betty White

As counselors, we all want our therapeutic impact to be maximized. There is one simple tool that can 'supercharge' your sessions with clients of all ages: the use of gratitude activities. When clients are called upon to regularly engage in gratitude practices, such as writing notes of appreciation, the use of gratitude journals, mindfulness practices based on gratitude, and so on, client's mental and physical well-being improve dramatically. This session will introduce you to gratitude, beginning with a definition, explonring gratitude in today's culture, and finally, and most importantly, allowing you to explore a variety of gratitude practices that are suitable for clients of various ages. Your will also have an opportunity to share your favorite gratitude activities. In addition to benefitting your clients, a regular gratitude practice can help you as well.

21. Play Therapy to improve Academic Achievement: Cultural Implications (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: Houston C
Topic: Play Therapy
Presenter(s): Ryan Holliman; PJ Blanco; Erika Rodriguez

School-based counselors must often justify the relation of their counseling with children to the academic mission of the school. Those who attend this presentation will gain an overview of how play therapy impacts academic achievement, with specific focus on the evidence for the approach as well as specific interventions that may be necessary. As well, participants will gain an understanding about the current evidence for applying play therapy for academic achievement with different cultural and gender groups, with specific guidelines for how to make playrooms culturally adaptive.

22. Body Size Equity: Addressing Our Humanness, Judgements, and Biases (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Ametis Bassir

This workshop will provide current research as well as areas of limitations and challenges for counselors on identifying their own judgements and biases when treating clients in various body shapes/sizes. We will explore the intersectionality of negatively internalized messages around weight stigma, fat phobia, and body shaming with other mental health issues. We will be speaking to the Health at Every Size paradigm developed as a treatment modality supported by The Association of Size Diversity and Health and their efficacy to increasing ethical competency to working with those living in various body shapes, sizes, and racial identities. We will close with effective tools that clinicians can utilize to address their personal biases and change their narratives around body image and mental health.

23. Beyond Cultural Competency in Supervision (P)
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: San Antonio B
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Alzada Benton; Heather Lindstrom

Supervisors will learn the difference between culture competency and culture humility in supervision/ therapy. There will be an understanding and awareness of how sensitive culture issues and situations hinder the supervisory process. Participants will learn creative supervision tools to address their biases and have difficult conversations with their trainees regarding culture sensitive topics while developing a more effective supervisory relationships. Through Relational Cultural Theory Supervision, participants will learn how to assess for disconnection in the supervisory relationship and use that conflict to enhance therapeutic growth. Creating mutual and meaningful relationships in supervision by learning to accept and respond to culture differences in the field increases effective therapy in a world in need of social justice. As mental health providers, healing for many; trainees and clients start in the supervisory/therapeutic relationship.

24. What Gabby Petito and Johnny Depp Must Teach Us About Domestic Abuse (P) - CANCELED
Time: 12:00-1:30pm
Room: State Room 4
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Presenter(s): Tabitha Westbrook

In the past year the Gabby Petito/Brian Laundry tragedy and the Johnny Depp/Amber Heard trial have thrust domestic abuse into the public consciousness. The discussion alone surrounding both cases has shown there is still significant misunderstanding of this critically important topic, even amongst therapists. Indeed, Bhavsar, et al (2020), found that mental health services training in domestic abuse is lacking. A full understanding of domestic abuse and coercive control is desperately needed to adequately care for victims and perpetrators. As counselors we all, whether we are in private practice or working in an agency or hospital setting, should be well versed in domestic abuse and coercive control. We must be able to identify when our clients are in such relationships, especially if we treat couples. Further, we also must know how to adequately treat and support victims with full understanding of the nuances and complexities of such cases lest we puts our clients at risk of death. Additionally, there is great value in taking a team approach to safety and treatment. This program will teach participants to identify domestic abuse, treat victims/survivors, and create/participate in multidisciplinary teams. De-identified cases will be presented along with real-world, research-backed, field-tested treatment strategies.

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THURSDAY 3-HOUR PROGRAMS

Thursday - Nov. 10


12:30 - 3:30pm

25. A Cultural Competency Framework to Counseling with Immigrants (P)
Time: 12:00-3:30pm
Room: Seminar
Topic: Private Practice
Presenter(s): Dawn Brunkenhoefer

Clinical documentation is guided by your ethics code, legal, and regulatory requirements within context and jurisdiction. As clinicians we are responsible for our client's medical record content, confidentiality, maintenance, and security. Move from being overwhelmed and insecure about documentation to feeling confident in your charting. You can cover everything required without having to write a book in each progress note. Feel confident providing person-centered care while meeting medical necessity and ethical requirements. Also, learn what you need to develop your own record keeping policies and procedures. This presentation is loaded with information on documentation essentials for clinicians in practice.

  1. Legal and ethical requirements for record keeping including Texas specific requirements for LPC, LCSW, and LMFT
  2. Clinical form requirements: consent for services, confidentiality, release of information, and initial intake assessment
  3. Treatment planning: goals and objectives
  4. Crisis assessment and safety planning documentation
  5. Progress notes: framework, interventions, and clinical language
  6. Discharge Summary and written client notification
  7. Billing Requirements including DSM5, CPT codes, and insurance panels
  8. Documenting medical necessity with the 'golden thread' Passing an internal or external audit with confidence tips and checklist
This presentation includes documentation samples and templates.

26. TxSAIGE Presents: Current Issues in Counseling LGBTGEQIAP+ Clients  (P)
Time: 12:00-3:30pm
Room: State Room 1
Topic: Private LGBTQ+
Presenter(s): Marvin Bellows; Bonnie King; Beck Munsey; Michael Lesher

The ability for counselors to deliver high quality care to LGBTGEQIAP+ clients is critical and will likely become more so over the next several years. Officers of TxSAIGE will be presenting an overview of current issues facing LGBTGEQIAP+ clients and communities at large as well as within the field of counseling. They will review the ethical guidelines for working with LGBTGEQIAP+ clients as well as the SAIGE (previously ALGBTIC) competencies and will outline how counselors and counselor educators can address issues including but not limited to microaggressions inside and outside of the counseling room, difficulties within the school system from peers and educators, mental health conditions more common among LGBTGEQIAP+ individuals, family conflict, and anti-LGBTGEQIAP+ laws. They will also be available for answering questions from their own lived experiences as members of the LGBTGEQIAP+ community and of those allied with them.

27. Ethical Application of a Multicultural Orientation in Counseling Practice, Education and Supervision  (P)
Time: 12:00-3:30pm
Room: State Room 2
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Angela Corrigan; Baisha Franklin

Through self-awareness, education, and ethical practice, counselors apply a multicultural orientation. This program will facilitate self-awareness through the use of a Cultural Formulation and Integration Tool. Participants will gain understanding of the seven multicultural documentation domains and apply a multicultural orientation in the treatment planning process.

28. Antiracism in Action: Real Talk about Increasing the Diversity of the Counseling Profession  (P)
Time: 12:00-3:30pm
Room: State Room 3
Topic: Professional Issues
Presenter(s): Marvin Bellows; Bonnie King; Beck Munsey; Michael Lesher

The presenters will review current issues related to structural inequities within the counseling profession and how these likely translate into barriers to care for underserved populations, particularly those with multiple intersecting marginalized identities. They will review the literature on racism and anti-racist pedagogy, decolonization of counselor education, application of multicultural and social justice competencies and reference the ACA Code of Ethics when appropriate. Presenters will lead a discussion of participants about their own personal and professional observations and experiences related to structural inequity in the counseling profession and identify perceived or known barriers to diverse students accessing and succeeding in counselor education programs. Presenters will provide resources for developing anti-racist pedagogy and breaking down inequitable barriers to be more inclusive for BIPOC counselor educators and counseling students. Presenters will discuss the ACA Anti-Racism Taskforce and development of the newest iteration of the ACA Strategic Plan as they relate to breaking down barriers. Participants will identify leave with action steps to move towards antiracism in their counselor education programs.

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THURSDAY PROGRAMS

Thursday - Nov. 10


2:00 - 3:30 pm

29. Emotional Anorexia (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A1
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Jill Riethmayer

More is known than ever about effective parenting; however, growing numbers of children, teens & adults are starving to death emotionally - literal 'emotional anorexics'! These children then grow into elementary & middle school age students, teens & adjults who cannot give to others what they themselves have never received. Come learn what is vital emotionally for all individuals: having these six spepcific life-long needs met - ideally from birth until death. These 6 needs remain through all developmental stages of life. After taking a close look at each specific need, then we will will identify specific ways to get these emotional needs met in our current lives. Come & learn how to assist those who have been deprived of emotional 'health' first to identify the root causes, then release the negative messages/baggages from those periods of their lives & finally, identify/explore the solution to emotional anorexias for each of these six life-long emotional needs.

30. Secrets for Successful Online Counselor Education (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A2
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Ya-Wen Melissa Liang

With instructional styles changed after the pandemic, the online learning platform cultivates a new trend for counselor education. Some students might experience a higher level of anxiety receiving online counselor education. This program will present students' perspectives and anxiety symptoms towards online counselor education and benefit educators to catch warning signs before students fall behind. This program will further introduce integrative and innovative technology to engage students with live counselor education.

31. Creative Interventions for Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A3
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Presenter(s): Adachukwu Uzondu; Isabel Santos; Bethany Atkinson; Michelle Hollenbaugh

Child sexual abuse (CSA) is considered one of the nation's most serious concerns, affecting people of all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, and backgrounds. According to CDC (2022), there are approximately 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 13 boys who experience child sexual abuse in the United States. The impact of CSA involves an intense detrimental experience with severe consequences in both childhood and adulthood (Blakemore et al., 2017; Katz et al., 2020). Some of these detrimental effects include depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, fear, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use disorder, and suicidal ideation. When these detrimental effects are left untreated, it can lead to the dysfunctional wellness of the survivors. Therefore, the implementation of creative interventions for working with survivors of CSA is necessary for promoting therapeutic outcomes and their overall well-being. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of creative interventions that clinicians can use to demonstrate good skills, build a strong therapeutic relationship, and discuss different strategies that will address the needs of survivors of CSA. Clinicians will be invited to engage in discussions regarding creative interventions for survivors of CSA and how they can utilize this information to work with clients who experience CSA.

32. GLOW UP! Career Counseling Strategies to Improve Your Treatment Planning with Gen-Z Clients (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A4
Topic: Career Counseling
Presenter(s): Macy Williamson; Ashley Penner; Logan Winkelman

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, career concerns and expectations among Generation Z (Gen Z) have shifted. This shift calls counselors to adjust the career strategies used in the past and 'glow up' to help their clients navigate career decisions. Understanding this generation is key to successful treatment planning by learning more about their drive, passions, and what each person is looking for when choosing a career path or job. Integrating career counseling and other counseling theories will provide the framework for successful treatment planning. Come to this session to learn more about these strategies and ways to meet the needs of Gen Z clients!

33. Juggling Roles Within the Profession: Building a Solid Foundation (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Houston A
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Teri Ann Sartor; Traci Test

Finding the needed balance to support the evolving transitions and shifting dynamics of the professional counseling/supervisory relationship while maintaining professional standards has been tested in recent years. Pre/Post pandemic has shown us the importance of blending the expectations and roles across counseling relationships and how we must adjust to manage the boundaries and professional expectations. Join us in an engaging conversation discussing higher developmental key performance indicators and appropriate standards for students and associates while enforcing appropriate boundaries and roles within working relationships. Explore the perceptions, expectations and roles in the counseling profession and how they form the foundation for future professional relationships. Ethical codes and best practices will be discussed as relevant BHEC, State Licensing, and telehealth/online education practices. Helpful resources will be provided for Educators and Supervisors for maintaining boundaries while enforcing roles within the student, supervisee and associate relationships.

34. Counselors' Responses to Three Mass Shootings (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Houston B
Topic: Grief Counseling
Presenter(s): Derek Robertson; Thelma Duffey; Elias Zambrano

Attend this session to learn about comprehensive mental health services delivered to residents of communities after a mass shooting. Learn about a comprehensive response in schools and communities following the Sutherland Springs shooting. Additionally, attendees will learn about consultation services provided to Sandy Hook/Newtown and Uvalde communities. Presenters will address challenges experienced, opportunities for service and student development, and lessons learned! Attendees will also learn about how some schools have averted mass shootings as well as factors that led to community resilience following the shooting at the Pulse night club. Potential causes of mass shootings will be discussed as well as implications for advocacy and preparedness.

35. Creating A More Inclusive Practice: Basic Competency in Treating LGBTQIA+ Populations (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Houston C
Topic: LGBTQ+
Presenter(s): Lacy Isenburg; Alex Chase

Research has shown three trends: 1) steadily growing numbers of LGBTQIA+ identified persons, 2) staggering rates of discrimination, stigma and conflict faced on a daily basis in the LGBTQIA+ community both their professional and personal lives, which leads to 3) more LGBTQIA+ identified clients seeking help from mental health care providers, among other professionals. It is crucial that mental health care providers have at minimum a basic understanding of the LGBTQIA+ community as a whole, knowledge of inclusive language, the differences and similarities of the populations within the community, a firm grasp of the daily difficulties unique to this population, and an idea of how to be and provide resources to LGBTQIA+ clients. Counselors must be equipped with the general knowledge of the processes of coming out, transitioning, and/or discovering one's sexuality and gender identity. Acquiring this basic knowledge helps promote good rapport and allows for a safer and more welcoming environment. Furthermore, due to the staggering and exponentially increasing rates of: suicide attempts, death by suicide, target of bullying, hate crimes against, homelessness, and death by homicide in this population, competency is crucial to have the tools and understanding necessary to create an inclusive place for LGBTQIA+ clients.

36. Misfire: Including More Counselors to Help Stop Violence in Schools Populations (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Aretha marbley; Patrice Dunn; Ian Lertora; Charles Crews

The presenters, practitioners, and educators share their commitment to increasing the number of counselors and mental health professionals in schools as a tool to help stop school violence. Their recently published article shares first-hand stories of gun violence and their powerful and soul-searching counternarratives of school-age children killed with guns. Embedded in the casestories are examples of counselors and communities coming together, mobilizing their resources, building alliances, and breaking the cycle of violence. The presenters will use the ASCA model, theory, statistics, and their narratives to showcase this untapped opportunity to advocate for including more school counselors and other school professionals in the fight to end violence in the schools. It will also provide strong recommendations to make schools safe.

37. We all suffer: The effects of chronic pain on family systems (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: San Antonio B
Topic: Couple & Family Counseling
Presenter(s): Alexis Croffie

Chronic pain can have a significant impact on individuals. However, the impact of chronic illness is rarely considered on the family system. More specifically, there is a plethora of research on the mental health concerns of individuals with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). However, there is a dearth of research on the family impact of patients with SCD. This presentation will examine the impact of chronic illness (specifically SCD) on the family system. The presenter will give an overview of SCD. Furthermore, the presenter will discuss ways that SCD can impact the family system. Finally, the presenter will discuss interventions to use with families of SCD patients.

38. My Digital Practice | Using Data to Drive your Practice Growth  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: State Room 4
Topic: Private Practice
Presenter(s): Christopher Taylor

Are you bringing the right clients? The ones you really want to work with? The clients that excite you? Private practice is hard enough without having to worry about all the day-to-day issues. After you have seen 30 clients in a week who wants to go home and work on their website, file insurance, develop their practice brand and Identity. All this is necessary to running the practice you want but can feel like to much. Learn how to manage this complex world and develop a clear practice identity using data you already have.

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THURSDAY PROGRAMS

Thursday - Nov. 10


4:00 - 5:30 pm

39. Post-Traumatic Play in Children: Learning to View The dynamic as a Trauma Informed Therapist  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Seminar
Topic: Play Therapy
Presenter(s): Kristy Donaldson; Heather Carey

Post Traumatic play in children is a topic that can elicit fear and uncertainty in many clinicians. In this workshop, it is our hope to provide clinicians opportunity to recognize the signs of trauma, increased understanding of play themes, and experiential, take-a-way activities to begin applying immediately. Join us in dispelling fears and embracing your own ability to cultivate safety for your most vulnerable population of child clients.

40. The School Counselor's Best Friend: Using Consultation to Handle High Case Loads  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Lone Star A1
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Tim Brown; Levi McClendon

School counselors are busy people. Nationally, the average ratio of students to school counselors is 424 to 1. Many school districts in Texas have ratios that exceed 500 to 1. With the rising demands on school counselors' time, many are seeking ways to work more efficiently and effectively. Using consultation is one solution to this problem. In this presentation, we will discuss the power of consultation and review effective ways to implement it as part of a comprehensive school counseling program.

41. Update from the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Lone Star  A2
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Steven Hallbauer; Cristina de Luna; Christopher Taylor

Panel discussion and Q&A with Board members on rule changes and current issues affecting Texas LPCs.

42. What's New, What's Not: Comparing the 2016 and 2022 ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Lone Star A3
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Betty White

Every six years, the American School Counselor Association reviews the Ethical Standards for School Counselors and proposes changes. The previous set of standards was ratified in 2016. At the American School Counselor's Conference in the summer of 2022, the new standards were finalized. School counselors should become familiar with the new guidelines BEFORE beginning the new school year. In 2016, changes in the standards transformed how couunselors do group work in schools, as well as how and when we break confidentiality for the safety of our clients. This session will highlight both the parts of the standards that remain the same, as well as those changes that will make a difference in how we deal with students, parents, and sensitive topics over the next six years.

43. Strengthening School Counseling Performance through Standards-based Supervision  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Lone Star A4
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Elias Zambrano; Derek Robertson

Recent legislation in Texas requires that school counselors spend 80% of their 'work time on duties that are components of a counseling program? (Texas Education Code 33.006). Due to historical role ambiguity, school counselors may need additional support to feel confident in addressing the social and emotional needs of students. At a time when schools are challenged with mental health concerns brought on by the pandemic and other events, supervisors may not be accustomed to providing clinical supervision. This program provides information on TEMPSC standard-based supervision to promote higher levels of school counselor performance for improved client services.

44. Walking the Tightrope: Anti-LGBTQIA Youth Legislation & Ethical Counseling Implication for Practice  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Houston A
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Nathaniel Smith, Ph.D.; RJ Davis, Ph.D.

The number of youth identifying as LGBTQIA+ has doubled in ten years (Jones, 2022). Generation Z (born between 1997 and 2012) reported feeling more comfortable to self-identify as LGBTQIA+ than older generations (Jones, 2022). Yet, despite this increase in LGBTQIA+ visibility, there is ongoing political and legislative pushback against this community.

In February of 2022, the Texas governor ordered the investigation of gender-affirming care provided to trans youth as possible child abuse (State of Texas Governor, 2022). Then, in March 2022, Florida passed the Parental Rights in Education Act (2022) which bans classroom discussion on topics of sexuality and gender identity. This legislation causes ethical dilemmas for counselors as 'mandatory reporters,' providing gender-affirming care to LGBTQIA+ youth, and while working in schools. Meanwhile, counseling competencies guide counselors to provide LGBTQIA+ youth affirming care (Burnes et al., 2010; Harper et al., 2013), maintain the confidentiality of clients (ACA, 2014), and use ethical decision-making models when faced with ethical dilemmas in serving LGBTQIA+ clients.

In this presentation, we explore counseling ethics and laws pertaining to counselors navigating this murky ethical landscape to grow as professionals supporting queer and trans youth and walk the tightrope of providing affirming care while practicing ethically.

45. Counseling with Neuroscience in Mind: An introduction to Brain Anatomy & Polyvagal Theory  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Houston B
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Brandi Solanki

Discover the basics of the brain-body connection and integrating neuroscience into your counseling approach. Neuroscience has made major progress in the last 30 years and is becoming a staple in counselor education and practice. Because of the newness of these discoveries and methods, many of our educational programs did not integrate this knowledge. We have had learned about this through other continuing education opportunities or trainings such as Polyvagal Theory, EMDR, Brainspotting, or Somatic Experiencing.

45. Counseling with Neuroscience in Mind: An introduction to Brain Anatomy & Polyvagal Theory  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Houston B
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Brandi Solanki

Discover the basics of the brain-body connection and integrating neuroscience into your counseling approach. Neuroscience has made major progress in the last 30 years and is becoming a staple in counselor education and practice. Because of the newness of these discoveries and methods, many of our educational programs did not integrate this knowledge. We have had learned about this through other continuing education opportunities or trainings such as Polyvagal Theory, EMDR, Brainspotting, or Somatic Experiencing.

46. TxCSJ presents- New Standards of Care (Version 8) for Gender Affirming Mental Health Care Assessment  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: Houston C
Topic: LGBTQ+
Presenter(s): Sarah Stillwell; Beck Munsey

As clinicians working with LGBTQ+ population, it's important that clinicians are more than an ally to clients and students; Clinicians should be affirmative by being knowledgeable of populations' needs. Many transgender/gender non-conforming (TGNC) clients will present in the therapist's office needing a letter to support medical/legal transition, which is required by legal and ethical standards, but counselor education programs do not prepare clinicians for such and there is no formal assessment. While placed in this gatekeeping role, it can become difficult for the therapist to establish a therapeutic relationship. Evidence-based therapeutic interventions become essential to bridge this gap.

47. Reaching Underserved and Rural Texans through Supervision and Advocacy  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Tara Fox; Kate Walker; Katye Galloway

There are several barriers experienced by underserved or rural Texans when seeking counseling services, including lack of counselors, lack of anonymity, stigma, transportation or distance to travel, and lack of finances. Approximately 570 counties across the United States have a shortage of counselors, 80 Texas counties do not have assigned counseling providers, and many counties have low counselor availability or limited access (Hurtado, 2022). In 2021, Mental Health America's (2021) annual report ranked Texas the worst state in the United States for access to mental health care. This is a social justice issue. The counseling profession is guided by advocacy competencies, including community collaboration and systems advocacy. The question becomes, how can we best serve our underserved and rural Texans? Through supervision, advocacy, and grassroots social media efforts, we hope to reduce the barriers to counseling services for underserved and rural Texans.

48. Navigating Client Suicide: Creating strategies for ethical supervision and organization response  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: San Antonio B
Topic: Suicide Prevention, Intervention, Postvention
Presenter(s): Cortnee Wright; Adriana Gutierrez

Suicide is a leading cause of death within the United States and a global health crisis. As clients often seek counseling due to feelings and behaviors associate with suicide risk, counselors may be left to navigate a client death by suicide. Research suggests that counselor are often navigating such a tragedy with limited or inadequate supervision or workplace support. This experience may increase counselor liability and decrease client welfare. Multiple counselor ethics requires that counseling leadership monitors client care and for counselor impairment. This session will introduce the impact that client death by suicide may have on a counselor, discuss the professional ethics around supporting a counselor through such a critical incident, and collaboratively create takeaways on creating a trauma-informed and ethically sound incident response plan.

49. Treating Dissociation Within Diverse Client Identities  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: State Room 1
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Presenter(s): Jessica Endres

As counselors, we all want to help our clients. Those who work with clients who have experienced trauma may refer to this as traumatic growth. But how do we foster traumatic growth in our diverse clients with impeding symptoms that may be invisible to the healthcare system? Clients with dissociation often are not treated in a way that fits their specific needs because such dissociation is missed by us as counselors. As a consequence, many clients are unintentionally excluded from the benefits of counseling. The traumatic experiences a client experiences are compounded by the intersectionality of their race, sex, gender, sexual orientation, and ability status, which can greatly influence levels of dissociation. The focus of this presentation will be on dissociation that can stem from the traumatic impact of repeated experiences that diverse clients may experience because of their belonging to a certain group. I will discuss what dissociation is and how it can be experienced by those belonging to certain groups, how to identify the needs of diverse clients experiencing dissociation in order to help promote traumatic growth, and what practical interventions you can use to treat the dissociation these clients may bring into counseling.

50. TAHEAD presents: The Power of Our Clients Voices  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: State Room 2
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Rachelle Morales; Kate Rodriguez; Andie Chapa; Karyna Garcia

The presenters will lead a discussion on how counselors of all experience levels can engage with their clients regarding their concerns of emotional, psychological, and personal well-being and safety in the current sociopolitical climate. The presenters will also use concrete and anecdotal examples of the challenges and difficulties our clients historically and currently experience with self-expression and finding their authentic and genuine selves. The presenters will identify and engage the attendees in discussion about practical application of skills that have helped clients enhance their voices and be heard regarding relevant human rights issues.

51. 'Atypical' Presentations: Exploring ADHD Assessment and Treatment for Women and Nonbinary Clients.  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: State Room 3
Topic: Assessment
Presenter(s): Sarah Silveus; Marvin Bellows

Despite comparable instance rates of ADHD diagnoses in adulthood, historical stigma, and inaccurate conceptualizations of ADHD diagnostic criteria have resulted in many girls and non-binary youth with ADHD going undiagnosed and untreated for much longer than their cis-male counterparts. This delay in diagnosis has been shown to adversely contribute to a variety of mental health concerns, including higher rates of depression, anxiety, and lower self-esteem. Given the prevalence of comorbid concerns, it is critical that counselors recognize the impacts that gender has on ADHD symptomatology in regards to both manifestation and effective treatment strategies. This content session will discuss the influence of gender stereotypes and socialization on ADHD diagnosis and explore treatment strategies targeted at addressing unique factors impacting ADHD symptoms for women and nonbinary clients, as well as assessment protocols available to counselors to assist in identification of ADHD and referral.

52. Cyber Power, Control, and Manipulation: Trends in Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence  (P)
Time: 4-5:30pm
Room: State Room 4
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Krystal Humphreys; Wendy Helmcamp

Adolescent Intimate partner violence has long been viewed as the deliberate violence behavior from one partner to another. It can take on different patterns of abuse to sustain control over one partner. Intimate partner violence in adolescent relationships has escalated over the last several years due to several factors, including the use of technology. The surge in technology and social media practices in adolescents has increased vulnerability to cyber intimate partner violence by perpetuating constant communication and accessibility to people. Traditional views of how to prevent and intervene in adolescent intimate partner violence continue to shift as technology usage continues to advance. Participants will be exposed to new research and trends associated with adolescent cyber intimate partner violence and learn best practices for prevention and intervention.

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FRIDAY CONFERENCE PROGRAMS

Friday, Nov. 11


8:00 - 9:30 am

53. Play Therapy 101: Hands On Experiential Training  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Seminar
Topic: Play Therapy
Presenter(s): Kristy Donaldson; Heather Carey

In this workshop, clinicians will get an overview of non-directive versus directive theoretical framework, as well as take away activities the clinician can use in their own practice. There will be hands on training materials. Come learn, play and grow with us. The presenters will use powerpoint presentation, discussions and experiential activities to enhance learning.

54. Growing Ourselves: Enhancing your Self-Care with Positive Psychology  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A1
Topic: Wellness
Presenter(s): Reade Dowda; Susan Henderson

Qualities that make counselors effective with their clients-such as empathy, compassion, and caring-also can leave them vulnerable to such negative outcomes as compassion fatigue and burnout. Counselors who take more time to sustain relationships, seek emotional support, and practice self-care tend to be less at risk for the negative effects of helping others. This workshop will help counselors identify symptoms of burnout and strategies to decrease burnout and increase resiliency. We will discuss specific interventions, successes, and how to implement positive psychology into your self-care routine and your work with clients.

55. TSCA Presents: You Can Earn a CREST!  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A2
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): Jennifer Akins; Errin French

In this session we will walk participants through the CREST award application process. The CREST honors comprehensive school counseling programs that serve student needs and make a difference in student outcomes! The CREST is fully aligned with the Texas Model and will help you advocate for your program. It's also a great way to show off all the wonderful things you've accomplished! Come join us to get started!

56. Black Counselor Perspectives on Cultural Humility in Supervisor/Supervisee and Client Relationships  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A3
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Terra Wagner; Brittany Kelly

Organizational policies, cultural norms, systematic and institutional issues, and the perceived responsiveness to issues related to racism may impact the experiences of Black supervisors, supervisees, and clients. Black supervisees may be more hesitant to disclose relevant personal and clinical information related to culture if they perceive their supervisor lacks cultural humility. A supervisor or supervisee's cultural identity may inform their view of symptomology and treatment planning for clients and their expectations of the supervisory process. There remains unaddressed concerns about the lack of cultural humility in supervision and supervisor reluctance to encourage supervisees to discuss cultural differences with clients and consider their cultural backgrounds when treatment planning. A Black supervisor and supervisee will share their experiences broaching conversations about race and culture to enact positive outcomes for supervisees and clients. Participants will better understand how racial identity development and racial injustice impact relationships between supervisors, supervisees, and clients. Presenters will address the need for increased focus on cultural humility and multicultural orientation in supervisory relationships and counseling sessions.

57. Navigating the Challenges of Long-Term Trauma as a Professional Counselor  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Lone Star A4
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Nolan Jones; Damion Davis; Joshua Freeman

Those in the helping profession are not immune from the struggles of life. This becomes especially apparent when a counselor is faced with a situation that will produce long-term trauma or suffering. News such as a loved one suffering from addiction, a diagnosed illness or disorder of a child, or even a cancer diagnosis all plunge the counselor into a situation of ongoing distress. However, rarely do these situations cause the counselor to immediately shutter a practice. So, how do we navigate these challenges and how do we know when it is time to step away from professional work during long-term trauma? This program will explore some personal experiences of counselors who have experienced long-term trauma and how they navigated those challenges. An exploration of ethical codes and how to ethically practice, or know when to stop practicing will also be discussed.

58. Trauma Informed Career Development and Counseling  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Houston A
Topic: Career Counseling
Presenter(s): Greta A. Davis

Reactions of distress such as self-blame, mistrust, intense fears, and hopelessness related to traumatic experiences can negatively impact career development. Career counselors benefit from an understanding of the complexities of traumatic experiences and trauma-related reactions in order to facilitate healthy career development and career transitions. Attendees will benefit from a discussion of adverse experiences in childhood that impact career development as well as trauma experienced as adults. Strategies for addressing trauma from intake to termination in the context of career counseling will be provided.

59. Protecting Your Practice with a Professional Will  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Houston B
Topic: Private Practice
Presenter(s): Dawn Brunkenhoefer

This presentation will cover the importance of a professional will in your practice. Developing a professional will is an ethical action for all clinicians and business owners. Every clinician needs a professional will outlining the care of the practice in the case of an emergency. It's not complicated and this presentation covers multiple components and considerations.


  1. Learn the importance of a professional will for clinicians and business owners
  2. Identify all the ways a professional will protects you and why death is not the only reason for needing one.
  3. Understand the core components of a professional will...going beyond naming an executor.
  4. Explore considerations for the group practice owner and how the professional will can ethically protect your team.

This presentation comes with a PDF template.

60. Breaking Confidentiality due to Suicidal Outcry: Creating Supportive Environments  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: Houston A
Topic: Suicide Prevention, Intervention, Postvention
Presenter(s): Tiffany Simon

In a busy and fast paced school environment, school counselors may be faced with students experiencing crisis situations that require a break in confidentiality. Students may already be in the state of mind of feeling powerless and fearful of what the next steps are. Although school districts may have policies on the steps to take when school counselors are working with students who have made a suicide outcry, the attending skills are not typically written into these policies. In this session we will explore ways to be present with the client/student and strategies to create a supportive environment that may help to maintain a positive client/counselor rapport. Topics such as 'how to slow down and be present', 'allow for the client's voice to be heard', and 'preparing for the possibilities when involving others' will be explored. Join us for a deep dive into how to create supportive environments when tackling the difficult journey of breaking confidentiality.

61. Sexual Health, Advocacy, and Social Justice: How can we do it all?  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Sana Vawda

Sexual health is often neglected in clinical practice, despite being a vital part of human development and overall wellness. When counselors fail to address sexual health topics with clients, comprehensive care can be compromised, and clients may not receive the treatment necessary to produce desired outcomes and enhance overall wellbeing. In recent years, changes in policy and sexual health trends have further impacted clients, causing additional distress and increase in mental illness. Now, more than ever, counselors play a significant role in educating clients about sexual health, and advocating effectively for related social justice issues. This has become increasingly difficult when counselor ethics may conflict with frequent policy changes, requiring careful and tactful navigation of ethical dilemmas.

62. Current Trends in Texas Ethics  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: San Antonio B
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Charity Kurz; Kathy Ybanez-Llorente

Members of the TCA Ethics Committee will present as a panel on trends in ethical issues. In an effort to increase awareness and support sound ethical practices and professional conduct among TCA members, topics often central to current ethical dilemmas, ethical standards, policies, and procedures will be discussed.. Ethical issues will be drawn from ethical standards that have been at the center of recent and common ethical violation complaints. This panel presentation will serve toward fulfilling the objective of educating TCA membership on ethical issues and discussing challenges in interpreting sections of the ACA Code and Texas Administrative Code of BHEC and the TSBEPC. A question-and-answer portion of the presentation will engage attendees in the discussion of ethics in Texas.

63. Inappropriate and Offensive, or Is It? The use of dark humor as a coping mechanism.  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: State Room 1
Topic: Professional Issues
Presenter(s): Joshuah Ellis; Tamra Kelly

Humor is a healthy coping mechanism known to release endorphins in the brain which makes us feel good and, ultimately, improves our quality of life. However, what happens when the humor goes dark? Dark humor used as a coping mechanism to navigate life's challenges can be helpful to some, but harmful to others. Mental Health Professionals who understand the complexities of dark humor in counseling sessions are better equipped to navigate the therapeutic process by integration of skills and multicultural competence that create a positive and inclusive environment for the client.

64. The Family Reframed: Inclusive Experiential Activities for Family Counseling  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: State Room 2
Topic: Couple & Family Counseling
Presenter(s): Diane Smedley; Chi-Sing Li

The demand for family counseling is increasing. Factors such as COVID-19, economic uncertainty, and political turmoil have assisted in shining spotlights on previously covered family difficulties. Thus, families are seeking treatment from skilled practitioners who are ready to help with present day dilemmas. For some families, traditional family counseling modalities are incongruent to their unique structure. Family counseling originated at the height of the traditional family structure. Therefore, many of the family counseling theories and interventions were purposed to directly serve families presenting with a traditional structure. However, the family system is an evolving dynamic structure. Consequently, families benefit when family counselors match this evolution with inclusive techniques in session. Experiential activities can be molded to the unique needs of each client, thus making them the ideal approach in working with dynamic systems such as families. In this presentation, we will review changing trends in the family structure. Moreover, participants will discuss and participate in inclusive experiential activities that family counselors can use in their own sessions.

65. Creating a Polyvagal-Informed Practice  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: State Room 3
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Dr. Cynthia Lee Coronado; Cynthia Pratt Pena

This session will provide attendees with a Polyvagal-Informed Framework, a mind-body approach for working with clients while incorporating the current understanding of the nervous system's stress, into your clinical practice and therapeutic sessions.

66. La Frontera Poderosa: Post-Pandemic Counseling with Borderland Chicanos  (P)
Time: 8-9:30am
Room: State Room 4
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Anissa Garcia; Gustavo Salazar; Stacee Reicherzer

If there's a word that could describe work with borderland Chicanos, it's 'nuanced.' Join us for this illuminating, funny, and oh-so-real session in which we'll dive into the nuance of post-pandemic counseling with this cultural community. Using case examples from our own counseling practices, we'll examine pro-Chicano cultural competence and how it informs the counselor-client alliance. In addition, we will demonstrate six micro-skills that we've identified as thematic to work with this population in the 2020s when pandemic-related loss and isolation are presenting significant wellness barriers: self-disclosure, flexibility, genuineness, humor, testimonios, and metaphors. We will also dive into the integration of theory with counseling practice for this population, demonstrating case conceptualization, goal setting, and treatment planning through a pro-Chicano and post-pandemic lens. This highly interactive presentation is for a general audience and will hold value for counselors who've worked with Chicanos from the borderlands for several years, as well as those who are new to the profession and/or counseling work with the population. Audience members will leave with an enhanced skill set that is rooted in pro-Chicano cultural competence, culture-informed case conceptualization, and an understanding of the vital role that the client-counselor alliance plays in this work with this culture.

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FRIDAY POSTER SESSIONS

Friday - Nov. 11


12:00 - 1:00 pm

Immediate Stabilization Procedure (ISP®): Stabilization without Re-Traumatization  (PS)
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Day: Friday
Presenter(s): Steve Beatty

The presentation will provide an overview of the psychological distress that occurs due to natural disasters, terrorist attacks, or wartime and how the Immediate Stabilization Procedure (ISP®) differentiates as a psychological first-aid solution for effectively stabilizing victims. It will include the evolution and development of ISP®, potential risk factors, criteria, and active signs of clients who may benefit its application, and its effectiveness.

Sexual Identity Support for Newly Identifying Queer Women in Long Term Heterosexual Partnerships  (PS)
Topic: Group Work
Day: Friday
Presenter(s): Heather Fry; Anna Beth Bonney

In a world awakening to freer sexual expression, more women are discovering their bisexuality later in life. Despite marriage being seen as a privileged institution with many benefits including better health, those who identify as bisexual benefit less and suffer poorer self-rated health than their heterosexual counterparts, especially bisexuals in straight presenting unions. This group will provide a safe space to explore sexual identity and establish a sense of community for partnered women exploring sexual identity.

The group will be made up of women between the ages of 30 and 50 who self-identify as being newly queer and in long-term heterosexual presenting relationships. The overarching goal of this group will be to empower newly queer-identifying women in their own lives and relationships. This will be achieved through validation of their newly discovered sexual identity, community building, and safe exploration.

Mindfulness-Based Strengths Practice: The Effects on Female Survivors of Military Sexual Trauma  (PS)
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Day: Friday
Presenter(s): Crystal Morris

This presentation will focus on mindfulness practices and character strengths in counseling female survivors of military sexual trauma (MST) and the effects on their relationship satisfaction. Attendees will learn about military culture, hear testimonies of service members and veterans' experiences of the effects of military sexual trauma on relationships, learn applications of mindfulness and character strengths from Niemiec's (2014) Mindfulness-Based Strengths Practice (MBSP) program, and how to build positive relationships in female survivors of MST, as well as ethical and culturally applicable considerations and implications for counselor education.

Bridging the Gap: Designing & Implementing a Latinx Counseling Concentration  (PS)
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Day: Friday
Presenter(s): Stephanie Ramirez

The counseling profession is constantly changing to meet the diverse needs of the U.S. population. With this in mind, one CACREP-Accredited Clinical Mental Health Counseling program sought to meet the needs by developing and implementing a culturally-responsive differentiated curriculum to train future counselors to meet the needs of the Latinx population. As of 2017 the Latinx population comprised of 18% of the entire U.S. population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2019). Furthermore, two of the top three states with the largest Latinx population reside in southwestern region (Texas and Florida) (Noe-Bustamante et al., 2020). This further supports the need to develop and implement a culturally-responsive counseling curriculum to meet the needs wellness needs of the Latinx population. The purpose of this presentation is for participants to learn about the development and implementation of a Latinx Counseling Concentration (LCC) and to provide helpful tips for programs considering a similar or related concentration.

The role of hope between family influence and career decision making of Asian international students  (PS)
Topic: Career Counseling
Day: Friday
Presenter(s): Hongshan Shao

This session reviews the literature on the career development of Asian international students including family influence, hope, human agency, and career theories. This study focuses on exploring the effects of family influence and human agency on career decision-making for Asian international students, along with hopeful career state as a mediator through a structural equation modeling (SEM) in Mplus 8.0. The mediation effect will be shown to help participants learn and apply the SEM method. It aimed to provide evidence-based support to counselor educators, students, and practitioners.

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FRIDAY PROGRAMS

Friday - Nov. 11


12:00 - 1:30 pm

67. Contextualizing Anti-Asian discrimination in COVID-19: Strategies for Culturally Responsive Counseling Strategies with Asian American Clients.  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A1
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Stacey Litam

Dr. Litam will expand upon themes discussed in her keynote presentation.

68. Beyond Therapy: Examining Risk-Factors, Resources, and Support for First-Generation College Students  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A2
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Teresa Espino; Allison Scott; Erica Little

With increasing access to higher education, campuses are seeing more First-Generation students enrolled in classes. Typically, First-Gen students attend college with minimal guidance or access to resources. This session is based on research and our experiences in working with First-Gen students at The University of North Texas at Dallas, where 70% of the student population is First-Generation. We aim to equip mental health practitioners with knowledge and skills to appropriately serve First-Gen students.

69. Mind, Body, and Heart: Tips on How to Navigate a Stressful Interviewing Process  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A3
Topic: Career Counseling
Presenter(s): Vanessa Colburn

Everyone faces a measure of anticipatory anxiety related to situations outside their control. Job interviews are common stressors both for clients and clinicians alike. Learn simple strategies to help yourself and your clients work through stressful moments through mind, body and heart connections. Explore Maslow's Hierarchy of needs, Self Compassion skills and participate in interactive grounding and expressive arts activities to develop internal support systems. Take home a few new tools for your tool bag, and revisit theories you might already know, as you learn ways to support yourself and your clients through challenging moments.

70. Dancing with Grief: Dance and Dance/Movement Therapy following Violent Loss  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: Lone Star A4
Topic: Grief Counseling
Presenter(s): Amanda Lopez

This presentation will describe and discuss grief and loss, dance therapy, and how dance therapy can be used in grief work specifically. The program format will also use storytelling about how dance can be utilized following a violent loss.

71. Cultivating Counselor Identity within Online Counselor Education Programs  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: Houston A
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Wendy Helmcamp; Tara Fox

Many online counselor education programs are thriving over the last two years. Due to convenience, accessibility, and flexibility, these programs provide an opportunity to pursue further education for individuals who may not be able to otherwise. Counselor identity is something that is fundamental to the counseling profession. Within an online program, educators must get creative in ways to cultivate professional identity. Given the lack of in-person connection, modeling and social learning are key components when teaching future counselors. Without the traditional classroom model, creating community within online counselor education programs is vital.

72. The Role of School Counselors in Integrating Culturally Responsive Practices  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: Houston B
Topic: School Counseling
Presenter(s): LaShondra Manning; Beck Munsey

In this presentation, participants will learn how to help foster inclusive learning environments that promote culturally responsive practices in school settings. When school counselors integrate culturally responsive practices, they become advocates to help holistically address issues that could negatively impact minoritized students. To engage in culturally responsive practices, the presenters will teach strategies and provide resources which school counselors can integrate and help teachers to learn how to manage the impact of conscious and unconscious bias, prevent microaggressions, and address imposter phenomenon and stereotype threat.

73. Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Applications and Interventions for Couples Counseling  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: Houston C
Topic: Couple & Family Counseling
Presenter(s): K. Michelle Hollenbaugh; Kimberlee Mincey; Ada Uzondu

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based intervention for the treatment of emotion dysregulation, and recent research shows that it can be used successfully in marriage and couples counseling to improve relationships and reduce emotional lability for both partners. In this session, participants will learn how the basic tenets of DBT have been adapted for couples counseling, and how to successfully implement DBT with couples. Skills covered include behavioral principles (positive reinforcement), mindfulness practice, reality acceptance, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness. This session will also discuss considerations for marginalized and underrepresented populations, and intersectionality in the professional relationship. Participants will interact, practice, and discuss specific DBT skills and techniques, and leave with usable ideas for their clinical work.

74. Got Your Six: First Responder Cultural Competence and Treatment Considerations  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Cyndi Doyle

Suicide, PTSD, trauma, cynacism, and relationship struggles are issues in which the first responder community admits they need to address. Increased public focus on law enforcement and their interaction with the public has resulted in increased anxiety and demands upon officers further negatively impacting their mental health. While counselors understand how to treat the issues, counselors must be culturally competent in order for these professionals and departments to trust the counseling process and treatment that will lead to healthier first responders in the field. This demand as well as the public awareness of struggles in law enforcement have created legislation and task forces to address access to mental health care and the competencies needed by mental health professionals to effectively serve this population. Leave this presentation, led by an author and expert in first responder mental and relational health, understanding of the psychological impact and adjustments made by first responders in order to cope with their daily experiences, including conditioning, mindset, cultural beliefs, and spillover that impacts their relationships and spouses. Discuss effective therapeutic interventions, treatments, and analogies as well as resilience strategies.

75. Enneagram and the Clinician: Enhancing self awareness of disintegration versus integration patterns  (P)
Time: 12-1:30pm
Room: San Antonio B
Topic: Social Emotional Learning
Presenter(s): Kristy Donaldson

Come and learn more about yourself as a clinician through the Enneagram. Begin to understand what the enneagram is, how to recognize your type, and learn to recognize maladaptive coping strategies when compassion fatigue encompasses the previous you. Attendees will be offered a general overview of the Enneagram as a whole to jumpstart their independent study of self in the future. Get ready to equip and empower yourself as a clinician and individual.

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FRIDAY CONFERENCE PROGRAMS

Friday - Nov. 11


12:30 - 3:30 pm

76. Crisis Ready/Crisis PREPARED  (P)
Time: 12-3:30pm
Room: Seminar
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Presenter(s): Michelle del Castillo-Davis

SPECIAL NOTE: There will be a live therapy cat in this program. In this workshop, counselors will learn practical strategies to help people cope during a traumatic event, explore what to say when we are at a loss for words, and provide a 'road map' to keep people functioning during and after a crisis. The discussion will include the impact of traumatic events on individuals, grief responses, and acute traumatic stress management. Participants will acquire skills to promote growth and engage in activities for ventilating and validating painful emotions. I will share my experience coordinating a crisis response to an officer-involved on-campus school shooting that left a student dead and a community devastated. We will also discuss counselor self-care and creative strategies to prevent burnout.

77. Ethical Selection of Assessments Across Counseling Settings (TAARC Sponsored Session)  (P)
Time: 12-3:30pm
Room: State Room 1
Topic: Assessment
Presenter(s): Rochelle Cade; Stephen Lenz; RJ Davis; Carolyn Greer

Selecting assessments for use in clinical practice can be a challenging endeavor. This presentation aims to provide practical support to audience members interested in integrating assessment in counseling. Through review and discussion of professional guidance and standards (e.g, RUST-4E), audience members will learn how to critically evaluate and ethically select assessments across counseling settings.

78. Ethical Dilemmas and Professional Counselors: Maintaining Professional Integrity  (P)
Time: 12-3:30pm
Room: State Room 2
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Bret Hendricks, EdD, LPC-S; Loretta Bradley; Lori Hollingsworth; Jacob Brown

We live in an ever-changing world in which we constantly face complex and multi-dimensional ethical dilemmas. In this era of change, we must continuously update our skills and knowledge to provide the best counseling practices. In this presentation, we will discuss practical ways to identify and deal with complex ethical problems through identifying different aspects of ethics dilemmas. We will show how to use ethics codes and ethical decision-making models to define and resolve these dilemmas. We will use fictional case studies to illustrate ethical issues and then learn ways to critically analyze steps to resolve the case study dilemmas using professional ethics codes, including the ACA Ethics Code, the Texas LPC Ethics Codes, and other applicable ethics codes. We will also discuss the use of developmental theories in solving ethical dilemmas. Discussion will be encouraged and handouts will be provided to all participants.

79. Adlerian Therapy Workshop  (P)
Time: 12-3:30pm
Room: State Room 3
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Sharese Martin

This interactive workshop will allow aspiring clinicians to learn, examine, and apply key Adlerian concepts. Attendees may acquire and/or enhance their therapeutic techniques and procedures. Clinicians will leave with Adlerian techniques to incorporate into their practice.

80. Identification, Warning Signs, and Diagnostic Considerations of Eating Disorders  (P)
Time: 12-3:30pm
Room: State Room 4
Topic: Assessment
Presenter(s): Ametis Bassir

Body image dissatisfaction, eating disorders, along with biases on weight and body size/shape are rampant within our societal norms cultivated by a stance of privilege which often discounts inclusion of many individuals. Due to the multivariate nature and connectedness of both body image issues and eating disorders, the incorporation of a multidisciplinary team, parental/family involvement, and support from multiple settings/areas are a part of the gold standard for treatment. With onset of eating disorders and body dissatisfaction occurring in as early as 9 years old, it is even more critical that we train counselors to identify risk factors, and work to collaborate with family and other outside resources. Across the research that has come out within the last decade, there has been more and more emphasis on examining various components in connection to the identification of eating disorders and ways minority populations define and assess body image. The goal for the presentation is for participants to take away screening methods, techniques to increase ethical competency of working with clients of various body shapes, sizes and racial identities, and preventative treatments to implement.

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FRIDAY CONFERENCE PROGRAMS

Friday - Nov. 11


2:00 - 3:30 pm

81. TCCA Hot Topics: Clinician-Client Perceptions of Counseling Sessions: Counselor Blind-Spots.  (P)
Time: 1-2:30pm
Room: Remington
Topic: Research & Evaluation
Presenter(s): Zachary Zoet

This presentation will begin with clinicians being reintroduced to the importance of tracking client progress across sessions. Studies will be provided that underscore that counselor judgment may not be accurate nor sufficient to gauge the probable effectiveness of ongoing treatment. Current widely used psychometric batteries may also only partially illuminate the scope of the client's experiences in a course of psychotherapy. Psychometric batteries which track session process-related, rather than solely symptom-related, data will be outlined and use cases identified. Lastly, a pilot study of integrating such measures into client care at a university counseling center in North Texas will be reviewed. The implications of this pilot study on client care will be discussed.

82. LGTBQ+ YOUTH: Learning How To Create An Affirming Space And Environment at Home And In Our Schools Through Proactive Strategies and Techniques  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A1
Topic: LGBTQ+
Presenter(s): Maricela Ponce

When a person decides to share their sexual orientation and/or gender identity with someone in their life takes considerable courage. The coming out process is a journey, and to share this special part of one‘s life with another person is not always easy due to the fear of being rejected or not supported. In 2022 The Trevor Project surveyed over 34,000 LGBTQ youth across the United States from 13-24 years of age;45% of those surveyed considered attempting suicide in the past year. The Trevor Project has captured a powerful statistical representation of how microaggressions, stigmatization, and hostile environments at home, schools, and communities contribute to mental health disparities among LGBTQ youth. One of the leading theories used to explain mental health disparities experienced by LGBTQ individuals is the Minority Stress Model. The minority stress model posits that sexual minorities face unique and hostile stressors (e.g., homophobic victimization) related to their sexual minority identity; consequently, these stressors have negative effects on their health (Meyer, 2003). LGBTQ youth are more likely to be bullied, threatened, and injured than their straight cisgender classmates. A 2020 peer-reviewed study by The Trevor Project‘s researchers, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found that transgender and nonbinary youth were 2 to 2.5 times as likely to experience depressive symptoms, seriously consider suicide, and attempt suicide compared to their cisgender LGBQ peers. Gaining a better understanding of the dynamics of living as a gender/sexual minority(GSM); can improve the therapeutic alliance with your student, but most importantly possibly intervene or prevent youth from taking their own life. Participants will learn how to support and communicate with parents who are struggling with understanding their adolescent who identifies as being part of the LGBTQ community, get a better understanding of the mental health disparities within the LGBTQ youth, and learn how to create an inclusive affirming space in schools, homes, and communities.

83. Incorporating animal therapy into general practice and crisis recovery, lessons learned in Uvalde  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A2
Topic: Professional Issues
Presenter(s): Linda Porter-Wenzlaff; Melissa Allen-Jones; Barbara Chase

The benefits of incorporating therapy animals into general practice, clinic settings and schools are explored as is risk management in order to ensure positive therapeutic outcomes, confidentiality, ethical deportment and safety. The ACA Animal-Assisted Therapy in Counseling Competencies are shared as well as common practical considerations. The lack of regulation addressing therapy animals and related organizations and the potential vulnerability this exposes practitioners and systems to is discussed. Accepted national standards and best practices are shared in an easy to follow checklist format for use by those wishing to safely incorporate quality animal therapy teams or organizations into their schools, clinics and practices.

Animal assisted therapy in crisis and disaster recovery is also discussed through the lived experiences in Uvalde Texas. The immediate issue of managing multiple animal therapy organizations who responded without invitation through how leveraging existing relationships between school districts and animal therapy organizations with prior collaboration experience facilitated a safe and effective rapid response is described. Knowing the standards and having prior relationships allowed for both immediate safe quality animal assisted therapy support to the community and then ongoing support as children returned to schools and families to community clinics in the summer and fall.

84. Sometimes the Bird is NOT the Word: Empathy Without Parroting - A Learning Experience  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A3
Topic: Counselor Education & Supervision
Presenter(s): Susan Henderson

Empathy is one of the most important skills for counselors to learn. Yet many counselors-in-training struggle with these skills because they focus on the 'right words' to say, only cognitively reflect clients' emotions, and stay in their head. However, empathy can improve with practice! The purpose of this workshop is to equip supervisors with tools to help increase empathy in counselors-in-training. The presenter will provide participants with tools that can facilitate increased empathy in counselors-in-training through small group experiential activities.

85. Prop me up: The Therapeutic Use of Props and Movement in Group Therapy  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Lone Star A4
Topic: Group Work
Presenter(s): Amanda Lopez

This program will share how to use props and movement interventions/activities to strengthen group cohesion and aid in the group process. This program is experiential. Participants should be willing to participate in movement activities. Movement activities can be modified if participants have movement restrictions, however, a willingness to explore movement and new activities is paramount.

86. Honoring Spirit: Assessing the Salience of Spirituality and Religion in the Counseling Process  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Houston B
Topic: Multicultural Counseling
Presenter(s): Harriet Glosoff

Culturally responsive counselors recognize that spirituality and/or religion often play a central role in the development and well-being of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. Further, spiritual and religious beliefs and practices may be related to clients' presenting issues or hold keys to resolving those issues. However, counselors may neglect or not feel competent to assess and integrate information about clients' spiritual belief systems into the intake and counseling processes. This program will be highly interactive, beginning with a brief review of core terms and key ethical considerations in addressing issues of S/R based on the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Issues in Counseling Competencies (ASERVIC, 2009) and the ACA (2014) Code of Ethics. Through discussion and case scenarios, attendees will review concrete suggestions to ethically address the spiritual/religious domain during the intake process and throughout counseling, along with ways to integrate clients' religious beliefs, faith traditions, and spiritual practices in counseling plans. The presenter will share tools (standardized tools and qualitative strategies) that counselors can use to enhance their cultural competence in addressing S/R issues in counseling.

87. Counselor as Philosopher?: Treatment Strategies for Existential Nihilism in Clients  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: Houston C
Topic: Mental Health Counseling
Presenter(s): Ryan Holliman

Sometimes a client presents with something that is far beyond garden variety hopelessness. 'I'm not sure there's any meaning in life!'; 'Is there any objective truth?'; 'If we all die, then what's the meaning of anything?' These aren't mere statements of frustrations but philosophical positions that can be somewhat impervious to our normal strategies. You might try to remember if there was anything useful from that lecture on existential psychotherapy in grad school, but nothing comes to mind. This presentation will provide participants with an overview of nihilism, philosophical responses, and how to effectively manage nihilism when it presents in clients.

88. Updates from the Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage and Family Therapists  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: San Antonio A
Topic: Ethics
Presenter(s): Jodie Elder; Russ Bartee

Hear from members of the Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage and Family Therapists about recent rule changes and the licensing process from initial application to upgrading to full licensure and/or supervisor. Learn about CE and interstate practice requirements, as well as common ethics violations and how to avoid them. You'll leave this session equipped to practice ethically as an MFT!

89. Trauma from Losing a Child: Infertility and What to Do when Hope Leaves the Building  (P)
Time: 2-3:30pm
Room: San Antonio B
Topic: Trauma Informed Counseling
Presenter(s): Katye Galloway

Infertility is a very heavy discussion to have and often a lengthy and tiresome journey to embark upon. Reproductive and other medical professionals dedicate their careers to helping people achieve dreams of having children. However, when that dream becomes an emotional nightmare, what can be done? How do counselors handle the hopelessness and true emotional roller coaster that this can become for so many people? Join us for an enlightened discussion of how to explore these with your clients who have travelled down this particular road.

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